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Friday, December 2, 2022
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Will This Daylight Saving Time Be the Last?

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Daylight Saving Time "Fall Back" | Image by SIAATH

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This Sunday, November 6, could be the last time Americans “gain an hour” following a unanimous U.S. Senate decision called the “Sunshine Protection Act.”

If the bill were to pass in the House of Representatives to become law, then March 2023 would be the last implementation of “spring forward.”

However, the House has so far not expressed intentions to move forward with the bill.

The ritualistic practice of changing the clocks an hour forward in the spring and backward in the fall spans a century.

The idea was first proposed in 1895 by George Hudson, a British entomologist who argued that the extra time would allow him more sunlight to study bugs.

Although Hudson never saw his idea come to fruition, Germany enacted Daylight Saving Time (DST) first during World War I to save on coal and fuel costs.

The biannual ritual has been relatively unpopular since its conception.

As early as 1919, farmers led a fight against the time-altering routine. Despite popular belief that farmers benefitted from DST, the sun dictated their schedule instead of the clock. Farmers had an hour less each day to reach merchants when selling their wares.

As a result, the practice was repealed nationally but remained in industrial cities such as New York City and Chicago. Nevertheless, DST was reimplemented in World War II.

To this day, daylight saving time remains as unpopular as ever.

Perennially, Americans voice their frustrations over DST. On Twitter, many said they believed the practice would end following the unanimous decision on the Sunshine Protection Act in March.

“Every year, I think I’ve figured out the daylight savings time transition plan,” wrote one user. “Every year, I fail.”

A 2020 study suggested that the sudden change DST elicits in circadian rhythms might lead to physical health problems such as strokes and heart attacks, and possibly even car accidents.

Overseas, the age-old practice faces similar scrutiny.

Natalie Bennett, Green Party leader in Britain, argued that households could save money on electricity annually if society abolished the practice.

In response to its unpopularity, Mexico abolished daylight saving time altogether on Wednesday, October 26, sparing a few border towns that work closely with the U.S.

For now, Americans must once again change the clocks in the car and household appliances, posthumously adopting the wishes of a 19th-century entomologist.

At least this Sunday evening, the “extra hour” of sleep remains for Americans to “fall back” on.

We welcome and appreciate comments on The Dallas Express as part of a healthy dialogue. We do ask that you be kind. Kind to each other and to everyone else in your comments. For more information, please refer to our Complete Comment Moderation Policy.

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Billy Ballard
Billy Ballard
28 days ago

I Want To get rid Of The DST Altogether Its Not Profiting Anyone Anything , So Lets get rid Of DST Thank You

J Burr
J Burr
Reply to  Billy Ballard
28 days ago

Have you ever tried to fit in a round of golf, go for a long bike ride, do a mountain hike, or do anything outside after work without DST? As a very active outdoorsman, it is amazing to have an extra hour after work and it makes a huge difference in me and others being active during the week. I’ll be crying every day if the Democrats do away with this very beneficial switch because people lose or gain a little sleep 2 times per year. I don’t understand how anyone that spends time outside would ever be for this and I can’t understand how people that may be sedentary can’t easily see the benefit of it. What am I missing, it is so beneficial is it encourages people to get outside?

Pap
Pap
Reply to  J Burr
27 days ago

I’ve suggested to my representatives that they move to the half hour. Seems a good compromise. Next spring forward, go up only 1/2 hour. Less dangerous in winter for children, people who hate DST get to keep 1/2 hour, those that like it still get 1/2 hour and never have to change the clocks again. We’ve put men on the moon, I think this could be accomplished.

Jessica
Jessica
28 days ago

DST is the worst. Even getting an extra hour of sleep means staying at work until 6.

Pap
Pap
Reply to  Jessica
28 days ago

You don’t get an extra hour of sleep with DST, you lose it. Say it’s 6am when you run the clock forward an hour. Now it’s 7am. If you normally get up at 6:30am, during DST, it is actually 5:30am standard. So you’re actually getting up earlier. It moves an hour of daylight to the evening, which in the heat of the summer here in Texas, sucks. How does it save electricity when your going to need lights on in the morning just to get ready for work? Or do they think we’re going to bang around in the dark. smh. 5pm on DST is 4pm standard time, not 6pm.

Kap Pac
Kap Pac
28 days ago

I’d like us to stay on Daylights Savngs Time forever. More daylight hours at the end of the day is great.

J Burr
J Burr
Reply to  Kap Pac
28 days ago

Yes, I’d prefer moving the time 1 hour forward year round so we always have more time after work.

Pap
Pap
28 days ago

I hate DST with a passion. I’ve written my Senator and Representative. Keeping DST all year is ludicrous. Jimmy Carter tried extending it back when I was in High School. It wasn’t long before he had to go to standard time. It was too dark when children were going to school. And in this day and age, that’s even more dangerous. Can you imagine how dark it would be in the mornings in January and February? Not to mention making morning rush hour traffic more dangerous. I guess we just don’t learn from history. The southernmost states definitely don’t need it. Arizona and El Paso don’t even change to DST. It’s hot as hell down here in the summer and would be better if the sun went down an hour earlier so that the house could cool down more before we go to sleep. Some people still don’t have AC, you know. Why do you think Mexico got rid of it?

With all the innumerable, devastating problems going on in this country right now, and they’re concerned with the clocks???!

J Burr
J Burr
Reply to  Pap
25 days ago

You are going to have the AC on anyway so what difference does it make? Instead for those of us that find 95 a very comfortable temperature and want to go outside, how about letting live and let live? With no DST it is 6PM and completely dark so I can’t do many things outside. I would love love love one more minute with light so why do you have to come down on us?

Thomas
Thomas
28 days ago

Sorry Billy, but that’s not true. What DST does it move the workday back one hour, essentially making it 7 to 4 instead of 8 to 5. That saves about a billion dollars a year in air conditioning costs.

Of course, we could accomplish the same thing if we just decided that the workday was 7 to 4 instead of 8 to 5.

Donald Bounds
Donald Bounds
Reply to  Thomas
28 days ago

Actually it makes no difference in utility costs. We have the same number of hot hours whether its DST or ST. Think about it.

Pap
Pap
Reply to  Donald Bounds
27 days ago

Yup, and when it’s 105 outside, it doesn’t matter where you set your thermostat, unless you want to set it to 110°?

J Burr
J Burr
Reply to  Pap
25 days ago

Exactly stay inside and turn on your AC all day but don’t kill the only time we have to spend time outside. I like 100 degrees and am outside every day until about 107, but I can’t do many things without light.

Donald Bounds
Donald Bounds
28 days ago

They need to just keep standard time. Children go to school in the morning during the winter when with daylight savings time makes it worse for them. We already have at least 2 states that have year round standard time. They got it right Arizona and Hawaii. Come on this Day light savings time was and is a gimmick. We as USA citizens are pons to our government and corporations.

J Burr
J Burr
Reply to  Donald Bounds
28 days ago

Really how does it impact kids? They go to school at 8AM? Having a blg block of time to be outdoors would be so much better for them and maybe encourage a little more time outside instead of inside in the dark to play more video games.

Pap
Pap
Reply to  J Burr
28 days ago

School STARTS at 8am. If they have to walk a ways, they may leave at 7am. Which means in the heart of the winter, they will be walking in 6am darkness on DST.

J Burr
J Burr
Reply to  Pap
25 days ago

It takes your kids 2 hours to walk in the dark from 6am to 8AM, really? I’m pretty sure they leave in the light and arrive in the light even with DST.

Freddy G
Freddy G
26 days ago

I dont understand how you gain or loose an hour for any period other than the two days affected. There are 24 hours in a day. The only time that changes are the two days we change the clocks. It always happens on a weekend. Financial markets arent open on weekends. Who does this really help.

J Burr
J Burr
Reply to  Freddy G
25 days ago

When you shift the clock one hour you have more time in the evening after work instead of before work. It makes a big difference for those of us that spend time outside.

J Burr
J Burr
Reply to  Freddy G
25 days ago

Please don’t vote for this. If it doesn’t make much difference for you, it makes a big difference for those of us who are active and like to be outside, please Freddy G.