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Bennett Speaks on Dallas Crime

Crime

Dallas, Texas, skyline at night | Image by Joseph Sohm/Shutterstock

In a speech given before Christmas to a gathering of business and civic leaders, hotelier Monty J. Bennett touched upon the scourge of crime impacting the city of Dallas. At the December Metroplex Civic & Business Association (MCBA) luncheon, Bennett addressed a full room and challenged the leaders present not to remain complacent about crime.

“In discussing crime and reading about it in the news, there are metrics our public officials will show you, numbers that they will give you, and press releases that will follow that talk about a decline in crime. Hear me now: crime is up. Way up,” Bennett said to attendees.

He continued, “Murders are up. Armed carjackings are up. Automobile theft is up. I can keep going; there are more categories. The evidence refutes the narratives of our politicians.”

According to the City’s daily crime briefing NIBRS REPORT CompStat Daily V1 (5) as of December 21, business robberies are up, vehicle burglaries are up, and automobile thefts are surging, up by 12%.

“I’m told that there are hundreds of open arrest warrants for suspected criminals in Dallas. We know where they are, but we don’t go pick them up. Can you imagine such insanity?” Bennett said. “These problems aren’t hard to solve. There’s just no political will to solve them. There’s no political will because the vast majority of the people here in this room and all your employees do not vote in municipal elections.”

“If you did, then the political will would exist,” he said. “Until you do, it won’t.”

Polling by The Dallas Express has revealed that Dallas residents believe the city population is shrinking due to homelessness and vagrancy (27.10%) and high crime rates (29.91%) — the top two responses received. FBI data indicates Dallas has more crime per capita than hotspots like Chicago, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, and New York.

Recently, state officials were ordered by Gov. Greg Abbott to reexamine their parole procedures after multiple parolees allegedly committed violent crimes in Dallas County. Two high-profile cases were specifically highlighted by Abbott: Nestor Hernandez, who has been charged with killing two people at Dallas Methodist Hospital while on parole, and Zeric Jackson, who allegedly killed someone at his girlfriend’s Lake Highlands home while on parole.

These incidents have increased concerns regarding Dallas District Attorney John Creuzot’s role in allowing alleged violent criminals to receive parole. During Creuzot’s tenure, Dallas has seen several thousand more reports of violent and property crimes as compared to before his inauguration in 2019, per FBI data.

As previously reported in The Dallas Express, certain districts continue to suffer disproportionately from crime. In fact, City Councilmember Jesse Moreno of District 2 has been named Crime Boss of the Month for the last two months due to increases in assaults and robberies, according to data provided by the City.

Additionally, crime continues to have an outsized impact on Dallas’ black and Hispanic communities, as indicated by the City’s own data reflected in The Dallas Express’ new Murder Victims Graphic.

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Bret
Bret
26 days ago

Our politicians are purposely being soft on crime. Dallas and the dfw area is getting worse. The bottom line is they are not arresting and prosecuting. This is the democrats idea. Be nice to criminals and they will turn over a new leaf. This is their philosophy. This is as stupid as stupid can be. All democrats need to be put out of office. All across the nation ,crime is increasing, mostly in democratic run cities. Until the people understand this nothing will change.

Bill Fox
Bill Fox
Reply to  Bret
25 days ago

Again, we actually had a higher murder rate in 2004 back when “we were tough on crime.” So if being tough on crime didn’t work back then, why would it work now?

I’ll also add that Dallas had less people living here back then, so the rate per capita is higher.

Your logic is flawed.

Covie M Weaver
Covie M Weaver
26 days ago

This is what Liberals bring to the table in every city run by them, Chicago, and Most of California to name a few!!!!!!

Ummm.....yea right!
Ummm.....yea right!
26 days ago

I’m just trying to figure out, why Dallas Chief of Police always bragging about how crime is down. What is up with the reverse psychology games? Why does he keep lying? Shameful, just shameful!

Bill Fox
Bill Fox
Reply to  Ummm.....yea right!
26 days ago

Well, without actually comparing the two sets of statistics that this article bases their claims upon, there is no way to actually tell which party is telling the truth. This online rag is always claiming that the sky is falling when it comes to crime, however, the entire country is seeing a large spike in crime so it’s easy to do.

Anna Williams
Anna Williams
Reply to  Bill Fox
26 days ago

Why would anyone read an online rag. Maybe you got the wrong rag. You are always leaving a message on a rag.

Let’s leave hatred in 2022. Happy New Years.🎉🥳

Bill Fox
Bill Fox
Reply to  Anna Williams
25 days ago

Let’s leave the hatred behind, but how about you work on the written language. Maybe go back and get that GED. That mess you wrote is nonsensical.

Anna Williams
Anna Williams
Reply to  Bill Fox
21 days ago

I like the GED program. Crime in Texas is up, stop talking about other cities and cleanup Texas.

I guess my GED is getting to you! Happy New Year.

Bill
Bill
Reply to  Bill Fox
26 days ago

Idc about the national crime increases other than the fact that Dallas now has the same mentality when it comes to dealing with it…by not prosecuting the usual suspects.
Democrats are weak on crime, as they appeal to criminals.

Bill Fox
Bill Fox
Reply to  Bill
26 days ago

How is crime not being prosecuted in Dallas, specifically? True, the DA said he would not prosecute crimes of necessity under $750, meaning items that aren’t intended to be sold. So exactly what is not being prosecuted,

Stop spewing crap you here on right wing media and think for yourself.

Ummm.....yea right!
Ummm.....yea right!
Reply to  Bill Fox
26 days ago

Well, Bill, I have my experiences with Dallas and it’s true, they aren’t reporting crimes. When you go online to their DPD site they’re not reporting shootings and murders. I promise you it’s probably been a shooting every single day last year. Dallas crime is up and he wastes resources. He used like 200+ officers and federal agents to arrest 5 people that he claims was causing all the crimes and murders would go down. The crime skyrocketed in other areas. He did some good alright….he’s seems to be worse than the previous chief…..🤔

Bill Fox
Bill Fox
Reply to  Ummm.....yea right!
24 days ago

I was easily able to look up murder totals in Dallas for the past decades. Not sure what crimes aren’t being reported. There are multiple ways to look up crime. Again, there is a lot of “probably” in your statement which is worthless.

Anyone ever think that maybe people aren’t jumping in line to be a cop these days? This is actually the case. Hiring and retention is a big problem.

Brentz Lawton
Brentz Lawton
26 days ago

District 13 crime and lack of sanitation is terrible. Two thefts at my home in the one year we have lived in the neighborhood. Just had our taillights stolen off our truck while parked in our front yard for a couple of hours on Christmas Day. Trash and recycle is always missed comes once a month. Home burglaries all around us this past week. Love Dallas, but wish there were consequences for crime committed so thieves would think twice. Literally don’t feel safe in my home anymore. Can’t go out to eat without the possibility of being held up at gunpoint for your car. Tijuana has cheaper tacos and the same crime rate.

Anna Williams
Anna Williams
26 days ago

I sure hope the Mayor, DA, sheriff Police Chief and Council were in the room. They had a Chief who interacted with community. Stood up against people who were trying to over take the city.

Well the men in the city don’t go and speak to the community and speak to them about all that is going on downtown. But the Mayor just raised 1.2 million for his campaign, while people are on the street.

I guess the FBI is lying about Dallas being worst than Chicago, Philadelphia and California. Read your paper and Vote but the money that the Mayor and City Council don’t care because the builder In Dallas don’t live in Dallas.

Bill Fox
Bill Fox
26 days ago

You contradict yourself:

Recently, state officials were ordered by Gov. Greg Abbott to reexamine their parole procedures after multiple parolees allegedly committed violent crimes in Dallas County.

These incidents have increased concerns regarding Dallas District Attorney John Creuzot’s role in allowing alleged violent criminals to receive parole.

Parole is handled by Abbott and his board at the state level. Dallas County has zero to do with it. Be better journalists.

Plus, I’m not taking advice on crime from a dude that participated in an attempted insurrection.

Last edited 26 days ago by Bill Fox
Lucille Rodriguez
Lucille Rodriguez
Reply to  Bill Fox
26 days ago

Local judges order parole, actually. While the terms of the parole is handled by the state, many could be given harsher punishments instead of released back onto the street with a slap on the wrist and a parole officer.

Bill Fox
Bill Fox
Reply to  Lucille Rodriguez
26 days ago

State board handles parole. Do your research. The author actually states this in their article above. Plus, what do you do with overcrowded jails? Keep the lessor offenders and use AirBnB? The system is beyond capacity.

Last edited 26 days ago by Bill Fox
Bill
Bill
26 days ago

When criminals get to vote, they vote for democrats…ever wonder why?

Anna Williams
Anna Williams
Reply to  Bill
26 days ago

Criminals don’t vote, remember the young man who was told he could vote. He got 2 years. The lady in Dallas I think she got 2 or more years. Houston is number 1,Austin 2
San Antonio 3 and Dallas 4.

The Governor lives in Austin, always talking about Chicago. He now has the worst crime in America. Please don’t blame the border. The people who pick the fruit and vegetables and build the highways. No one calls ICE to look at their ID and they are having to hire people who work for a living.

The Uvalde people were working in the field’s while their children were being murdered. Cleanup Texas and Democrats don’t run Texas because of gerrymandering.
And the gerrymandering is not in democrats hands.

Bill Fox
Bill Fox
26 days ago

FYI, there were more murders in 2004 than 2022. Just saying. We’ve had crime waves in the past.

Bill Fox
Bill Fox
26 days ago

This place doesn’t like when I mention that their owner, [email protected] was on the Capitol steps on Jan 6.

Patrick Moody
Patrick Moody
25 days ago

I am confused because there is a diagnostic DSM manual in the professional field of psychology (liberal arts and science) that defines repeated criminal behavior as APD with often psychopathy traits. There is no cure or no amount of giving them a 2nd chance will change this disorder. Politicians should not be the ones to call the shots in this regards. Their policies cause the destruction of families that often perpetuates this criminal mindset. Being poor doesn’t cause this, but having an abusive and absent parent(s)does. They should be into prevention programs not trying to fix the issue with allowing more of the same destructive behaviors to be visited upon children, thus creating new generation of individuals with APD.