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Dallas, TX
Saturday, December 3, 2022
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Dallas Apartment Complexes: Hotbeds for Crime

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Dallas Police Investigate at Apartment Complex | Image by NBC DFW

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When he took the job in 2020, Dallas Police Chief Eddie Garcia began implementing what he referred to as a Violent Crime Reduction Plan (VCRP), officially implemented in May 2021, yet city streets continue to grapple with crime.

While the Dallas Police claim overall “violent street crime” — a term that includes murders, robbery, and nonfamily violence aggravated assault — was down citywide within the first year of implementation, data shows that overall crime is up, police response times have slowed, and several of those very categories of violent street crime have indeed risen.

As reported by The Dallas Express, data shows two of the three types of violent crime mentioned by DPD saw increases in the City of Dallas when comparing August 2022 to August 2021.

The lone reduction — the number of Homicide Offenses – dipped by just two, while data show the homicide rate has actually increased after jumps in July and August.

Car thefts are up by over 1,300 compared to this time in 2021.

The department admits “there are still challenges ahead” when it comes to some violent crimes, such as the number of homicides, which it said, “is up from the same time in the summer 2021.”

Statistics provided by a representative from the Dallas Police Department in an interview with The Dallas Express reveal that 30% of crime occurs in apartment complexes. This figure is far below the 57% mentioned by the chief in a recent press conference.

Regardless of which statistic proves more accurate, the people who care about crime in the city are the people whose lives are affected by it, often residents in these complexes.

Gabriel Rodriquez, who lives in a South Dallas apartment complex, told The Dallas Express he does not feel safe in his neighborhood.

“At night, you got to keep your eyes open to your surrounds,” said Rodriquez.

“I don’t feel safe around here,” he added.

In South Dallas, crime is high, and shootings are common in the numerous apartment complexes dotting the area.

Of the crimes that take place in Dallas apartment complexes, the most significant crime trends are motor vehicle burglaries, other thefts, and aggravated assaults, according to police.

We welcome and appreciate comments on The Dallas Express as part of a healthy dialogue. We do ask that you be kind. Kind to each other and to everyone else in your comments. For more information, please refer to our Complete Comment Moderation Policy.

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JEAN
JEAN
2 months ago

No one seems to feel safe in our homes or cars anymore

Bob
Bob
Reply to  JEAN
2 months ago

Jean — Get yourself a gun and learn how to use it efficiently and safely. Texas has what is called a Castle Doctrine, giving you the legal right to use deadly force if someone breaks into your house, apartment or car. It’s you who are responsible for keeping yourself and your loved ones safe. Most police actions regarding home invasions are writing reports after the crime has taken place. It is highly unlikely that they will ever be there in time to protect you.

Cricket
Cricket
2 months ago

Gracious Heavenly Father, thank you for your mercies; we know that words have power because you framed the world by the “Word.” Your Holy Precious Word says:
” 2 Corinthians 2-6 But I beseech you, that I may not be bold when I am present with that confidence, wherewith I think to be bold against some, which think of us as if we walked according to the flesh.
 For though we walk in the flesh, we do not war after the flesh:
 (For the weapons of our warfare are not carnal, but mighty through God to the pulling down of strong holds;)
 Casting down imaginations, and every high thing that exalted itself against the knowledge of God, and bringing into captivity every thought to the obedience of Christ;
 And having in a readiness to revenge all disobedience, when your obedience is fulfilled.”

Thank you Lord for protecting the establishments where your people reside; and reverse the word of “Hotbed for crimes” in Jesus Holy Divine Name Amen.

mike grunewald
mike grunewald
2 months ago

just asking are these low income or Hud housing

No longer anonymous
No longer anonymous
Reply to  mike grunewald
2 months ago

It’s weird how people hear other people say, oh it’s the low income, hud, affordable homes, etc. that causes the crimes to be high. That’s so typical! There’s always a deeper issue other than the aforementioned, and I wish people would just open their freaking eyes instead of always placing easy blames. Look harder….but they not, cause it’s too easy to just say the same thing over and over again!

JNW
JNW
Reply to  No longer anonymous
2 months ago

You mean like white people are racist and cops are bad and the low income people are victims? Crime does increase when public assisted housing moves into new areas making crime higher. Look at the numbers and then rethink your post.

No longer anonymous
No longer anonymous
Reply to  JNW
2 months ago

Maybe you should read the statement above over again because you’re saying the same exact thing I just said everyone says. Looking harder… does not mean coming up with the same ol’ theoretical typical responses of “white people being racist” or “cops being bad” or “low income people being victims.” That’s my point, instead of actually caring enough to do something about it or even find out, you rapidly fire off made up falsities.

mike grunewald
mike grunewald
Reply to  No longer anonymous
2 months ago

so what are you saying these crimes are in “upper” housing you are full of if it’s gang banger apartments which are mostly Hud housing

No longer anonymous
No longer anonymous
Reply to  mike grunewald
2 months ago

Again, you have the typical response of, “are you saying these crimes are in upper housing,” instead of looking harder. Have you visited those communities and tried to find out? Have anyone from “upper housing” (whatever that means) tried to help a single person in that community? When have you stopped by a friend of yours that stays in one of those communities and asked them what do they need, what can you do to make a difference in their life today? Again, I’ll say it, look harder….I’ll wait!

Val
Val
Reply to  mike grunewald
2 months ago

Any complex I’ve lived in since I moved here last year has been an equal opportunity place. Any and everyone can rent here. Your question should be “is it the affordable complexes”. Not everyone wants to, nor should they have to decide whether to be and feel safe vs having food when the bills are paid. The pay I get here is insulting with 20+ years experience in the Healthcare field. Trust me I would love to live in a better area and a better school district for my 14 year old honors student but I can’t as a single parent. Maybe we should get paid more or housing costs, even in nice areas should be capped. Just remember people are not always in a situation because they want to be.

Arlene koeppen
Arlene koeppen
2 months ago

Crime is born out of the attitudes, values and beliefs of people who commit crimes. Those have to change if crime is to decrease. We need to teach our children empathy, respect and self control. Without that change, we’re caught between band aids and triage.

Mark
Mark
Reply to  Arlene koeppen
2 months ago

For this…we need to give-back control to teachers and trust them to do contact discipline and to use other tools like peer shaming. In the 1960’s and early 1970’s elementary schools…children behaved. Parents were “with” the teachers on disciplining. Two years before i arrive in 1st grade…one student misbehaved so badly the teacher had the janitor put a diaper on him and march him around the halls to shame him. Now, I understand the humiliation of this one student…but hear me out…for the next 10 to 15 years…there was an air of silent fear over every student in that particular elementary school about the diaper treatment…the teachers had it easy and the students were quiet and were actively learning. One diaper on one student…gave rise to decades of well behaved academically flourishing kids.

Janet
Janet
Reply to  Mark
2 months ago

Really? And how would YOU know this? What is the name of, and author of this study? Is there a reference, paper, or book showing the number of kids in the study, when it started, ended, and how they reached the conclusion of “decades of well behaved academically flourishing kids”? Or did it conclude with one traumatized child with very low self esteem?

Val
Val
Reply to  Mark
2 months ago

Yes..let’s create a bigger community with dysfunction and let’s create more psychological/mental problems. The fact that you even think any of that is okay speaks loudly about you. Were you that student? I’d sure like to see where he or she is mentally and how much moral and self esteem they have now.
The whole hit and embarrassing tactics to force kids to do what society thinks they should is absurd. These kids are individuals and are not uniform in learning or anything else. American standards for everything is one tracked and it shouldn’t be. EVERYONE IS DIFFERENT and what works for one may not work for all. Depending on the childspsyche and predisposition and trauma passed down, embarrassing them can create a monste of a entire different kind within them and it would be no fault of their own.

Val
Val
Reply to  Arlene koeppen
2 months ago

Not entirely true. Crime is bread from desperation and circumstances which at times is not directly created by the individual. How many people in prison for murder and rape are Bible thumpers who had half decent parents and/or dual parent households? How many of the were “raised right” (whatever that means) and are in prison, jail or even c4iminals that havent been caught? MANY.

Mark
Mark
2 months ago

Currently in today’s schools we have kids that kick, hit, abuse and use the most shocking vulgar profanity on teachers. They took away the teacher’s power to physically discipline or shame the student in front of their peers. Now you have the student exiting H.S. at 18…totally unprepared for the real world. They get stopped by the police …and they fall right back into their Big Shot Pants, not listening or following directions from authority and wind up dead on the streets.
We cannot rely solely on parents to teach their children…we need to return power back to the teachers and allow them all the disciplinary tools of the 1950’s and 1960’s up until the mid 1970’s.

Last edited 2 months ago by Mark
K Prude
K Prude
Reply to  Mark
2 months ago

And in the 80s – 90s too. I can remember being disciplined in elementary and high school but then of course it takes one parent that doesn’t like something to start a damn tsunami and then before you know it, corporal punishment was gone. OR even how sports are taught as well.. every kid deserves to play or have a participation ribbon even though they did nothing. How does any of that teach a child when they step out in the real world absolutely nothing. I honestly wish they go back to when I was in school and you had to work for what you want, behave and if you don’t you deal with the repercussions.

Val
Val
Reply to  K Prude
2 months ago

Do you even hear yourself? “Corporal punishment was gone”…you think subjecting impressionable kids who may be in bad homeless life situations is a great idea. That sounds like a passed on massa/slave mentality to me. This person won’t do what I WANT so let’s punish them. Make it make sense. The whole it “worked when I was a kid” line is old. You know how many people of the previous or past generations were drug addicts and everything else? You were led to believe it worked or mabe it worked in your particular “controlled environment”.

Val
Val
Reply to  Mark
2 months ago

And there’s always more to the story with kids like that but nobody takes the time or effort to know the kid as an individual or learn what they are going through that nobody knows about that makes them behave that way. In a lot of those types of kids there are deep issues from abuse, to drugs in the home, to not having food and the list can go on. Hardly ever is it just because.

Dale Greer
Dale Greer
2 months ago

60% of Dallas households are rentals, and at least half of those are apartments. 30% of Dallasites live in apartments, so it makes sense that around 30% of crime would be in apartments.
People who misuse numbers to incite fear hope that fearful people will listen to their “solutions”.