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Man Arrested for Fentanyl Overdoses

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A man ensures the safe treatment of fentanyl | Image by fentanylsafety.com

A 36-year-old Plano man known as “Truth” has been charged with federal drug trafficking violations after allegedly being found with two kilograms of raw powdered fentanyl, according to U.S. Attorney Brit Featherston

Eric William Mather, or “Truth,” made his initial appearance in court before U.S. Magistrate Judge Christine Nowak on January 12, 2022. He was charged with multiple violations including conspiracy to launder money and conspiracy to distribute fentanyl.

Mather was identified by the North Texas OCDETF Strike Force 2 (SF2), with the assistance of the DEA Dallas Tactical Diversion Squad, as a fentanyl source back in September 2022. Mather was allegedly supplying both counterfeit pharmaceutical pills laced with fentanyl and raw powdered fentanyl. 

Mather is being held responsible for multiple overdoses in North Texas. In what has been called an epidemic, rates of overdose deaths due to synthetic opioids like fentanyl increased nationwide by more than 56% from 2019 to 2020, as previously reported by The Dallas Express. Two milligrams of fentanyl is enough to deliver a fatal dose.

During Mather’s arrest, law enforcement allegedly seized over a kilogram of fentanyl-laced pills, two kilograms of raw powdered fentanyl, 30 firearms, a pill press, and luxury vehicles. 

In November 2022, Mather was named in a fourth superseding indictment that was returned by a federal grand jury, according to the Eastern District of Texas U.S. Attorney’s Office. 

Assistant U.S. Attorney Heather Rattan will be prosecuting the case, and it is currently being investigated by the Dallas Police Department, the Collin County Sheriff’s Office, the U.S. Marshals Service, the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, the Drug Enforcement Administration, and IRS Criminal Investigations. 

Fentanyl trafficking has become a major issue across the United States, including in Dallas, where local police seized 3,919 grams in 14 operations in the first 10 months of 2022.

Although the Dallas City Council has held meetings over the apparent spike in drug crimes and drug-related deaths, this has been to little effect. In December alone, the city saw 494 drug-related crimes.

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Bill
Bill
23 days ago

The war on drugs has been fought for 50+ years and it appears that drugs have been winning the entire time. The real loser in this war has been the civil rights of all Americans and the 4th Amendment is a shadow of its former self. I seem to recall a constitutional amendment being required to make alcohol illegal but I do not recall an amendment being passed that outlawed street drugs.

Djea3
Djea3
23 days ago

Doing the math there are over 2 million doses of Fentanyl involved. I suggest that the prosecution include a charge of conspiracy to commit aggravated assault (battery) for profit in the sale of Fentanyl, at 200,000 charges against the perpetrator. The nice thing is that Texas law allows that there be no pre-determined namable victim, only the meeting of the definition. That is one in every ten at minimum sales would end up in meeting the requirement of doing bodily harm.

The fact there are two known deaths proves absolutely that the state requirement is met.

The conspiracy charge is actually a separate charge in itself.

We add that to the 2 murder charges and no matter what this guy will never walk out of a prison, if not executed.

Michael Allen
Michael Allen
22 days ago

He should receive the death penalty. Thugs like this, don’t care about human life. Addiction is a disease. Addicts should not be murdered because of it. All this guy cared about was money. I feel the city CAN do more than what they are presently doing, which amounts to nothing. Give the state attorneys permission to publicly hang thugs, and I will bet that it will curve the majority of crime.