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Largest 3D-Printed Home Community Underway in Texas

Real Estate

3D printed future home technology in the Community First! Village in Austin, TX. | Image by University of College, Shutterstock

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The largest community of 3D-printed homes is coming to Texas, in an area near Austin. The new project aims to be the largest community in the world built using 3D printing technology. Construction has already started on the community, Dezeen reported, and will feature 100 homes. They have been designed by Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) and ICON.

ICON’s Vulcan robotic construction system is operated by Lennar, a construction company, to create the structural aspects of the houses, according to Dezeen.

The material used is called Lavacrete and is a highly durable type of concrete valued for its fast curing and minimal shrinkage.

The community has been given the nickname Wolf Ranch.

Jason Ballard, an ICON co-founder, claimed these homes will be better than other types of houses.

“For the first time in the history of the world, what we’re witnessing here is a fleet of robots building an entire community of homes. And not just any homes, homes that are better in every way,” Ballard told Dezeen. “In the future, I believe robots and drones will build entire neighborhoods, towns, and cities, and we’ll look back at Lennar’s Wolf Ranch community as the place where robotic construction at scale began.”

There will be eight different floor plans in the community. Homes will range between 1,574 and 2,112 square feet.

Houses are designed to look like Texan ranch-style homes, and the community will look similar to a traditional American suburb, according to Dezeen. They will have three and four-bedroom layouts, and the community will also feature yards and driveways.

Homes can be purchased starting in 2023, and prices will start in the mid $400,000s.

The team with ICON and BIG told Dezeen, “Blending contemporary Texas ranch-style aesthetics, the community of 3D-printed homes features elevated architectural and energy-efficient designs that highlight the benefits of resiliency and sustainability with the digital possibilities of additive construction.”

The Dallas Express first reported on the 3D construction in November 2021, and at the time, Ballard said these kinds of homes can be helpful for the housing crisis.

“ICON exists as a response to the global housing crisis and to put our technology in service to the world,” Ballard shared.

A partner at BIG, Martin Voelkle, who spoke with NBC DFW last November, stated the partnership with Lennar and ICON made sure they could reach the biggest audience.

Voelkle shared that this type of construction also reduces the waste left over.

“By partnering with ICON and Lennar, we are able to see this new technology roll out to the widest possible audience. The 3D-printed architecture and the photovoltaic roofs are innovations that are significant steps towards reducing waste in the construction process, as well as towards making our homes more resilient, sustainable, and energy self-sufficient,” Voelkle said.

The first 3D printed home in the Dallas-Fort Worth region was constructed by Von Perry LLC, The Dallas Express reported. It was built with a concrete foundation, and the walls were printed. The process took around one week, according to Von Perry LLC co-founders Trayvon Perry and Sebin Joseph.

Other 3D home projects in other states include the first two-story 3D-printed home in Ithaca, New York, and 3D-printed homes in California that the construction company claims will be the world’s first to achieve net zero, meaning the home will produce as much energy as it consumes.

 

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