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VIDEO: Demolition of Baltimore Bridge Called ‘Flawless’

A controlled demolition of a section of the Francis Scott Key Bridge resting on the Dali container ship in Baltimore. | Image by Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images
A controlled demolition of a section of the Francis Scott Key Bridge resting on the Dali container ship in Baltimore. | Image by Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

One of the busiest sea routes in the United States is one step closer to reopening after being blocked for weeks following the partial collapse of the Francis Scott Key Bridge in Baltimore in March.

On Monday, local authorities conducted a controlled demolition of the remaining portion of the bridge, which spanned the Patapsco River. The demolition work will facilitate the cleanup of the bridge debris and allow workers to free the ship that has been stuck beneath the wreckage since the catastrophic collapse.

The bridge, a vital link in Baltimore’s transportation infrastructure, was struck by the cargo ship Dali on March 26, causing a section of the bridge to fall into the river below. The incident led to the deaths of six construction workers who were on the bridge at the time of impact. Some 4,000 tons of debris fell into the water and onto the cargo ship, effectively obstructing shipping operations through the area.

A video of the controlled explosion was posted on X by AP News.

Officials reported that Monday’s demolition, which had been delayed over the weekend due to adverse weather conditions, went according to plan.

“Thank you to everyone at Unified Command for a flawless, safe execution of these precision cuts and for the care you’ve shown our city during this process,” said Baltimore Mayor Brandon M. Scott via social media.

In the wake of the collapse, the Port of Baltimore, renowned as the busiest in the nation for car shipments, faced a period of closure, disrupting vital supply chains. While some shipping has resumed through temporary channels, authorities are working to restore the shipping route to full operational capacity. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has set the end of May as the target date for reopening the route, the BBC reported.

Maryland state officials estimated that rebuilding the bridge would cost $1.9 billion and take four years to complete.

As previously reported by The Dallas Express, investigations into the collapse are ongoing. The Federal Bureau of Investigation and the National Transportation Safety Board are scrutinizing the circumstances leading to the tragedy. The City of Baltimore has taken legal action against the ship’s owners and managers, alleging gross negligence and recklessness.

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