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Ford To Help Electrify Dallas Through 10-Year Deal

Ford Pro Charger | Image by Ford Pro
Ford Pro Charger | Image by Ford Pro

The City of Dallas has taken the next step towards developing a fully electric fleet of vehicles by signing a multi-year agreement with Ford Pro.

The collaboration was announced by Ford Motor Company in a press release on Tuesday.

As part of the agreement, Ford Pro, the automaker’s commercial division, will help the City achieve its goal of running an exclusively electrified fleet of vehicles by 2040. The 10-year agreement aims to expand and enhance EV charging infrastructure for the City’s fleet operations. The deal will see Ford Pro chargers installed at City worksites, equipped with Ford’s charging software to monitor performance.

Last year, The Dallas Express reported that the Dallas City Council passed a resolution authorizing $12 million in taxpayer spending to create and maintain EV charging infrastructure. The reserves were earmarked for the forthcoming deal with Ford.

“It is in the best interest of the City to contract with a third-party that can provide high quality electric vehicle charging infrastructure and charging software management and to create a long-term partnership that is flexible,” read the resolution approved by council members.

At the federal level, the U.S. government wants most new federal vehicles — affecting a potential fleet of around 380,000 — to be zero-emission by 2035, as the Biden administration announced in 2021. State and local governments are following suit, with Ford already enjoying hundreds of local governments, like the City of Dallas, as customers.

“This agreement with Ford Pro marks a significant milestone and will help our city avoid energy waste and save money on energy costs. We look forward to building upon our work with Ford Pro to scale further EV charging infrastructure and electrify our fleet operations to continue to serve our great city now and in the future,” said Mayor Eric Johnson, per Ford’s press release.

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