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Saturday, September 24, 2022
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New K-9 Units Deployed to Border

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Six K-9 teams graduated this month as part of the inaugural class of the Texas Highway Patrol Canine Tracking Operations Program. | Image by the Texas Department of Public Safety

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Six new K-9 teams are heading to the U.S.-Mexico border after graduating from a five-week intensive training program.

Consisting of three Dutch Shepherds and three Belgian Malinois, this group of dogs represents the inaugural class of the newly founded Texas Highway Patrol Canine Tracking Operations Program.


Designed to equip teams with the necessary skills for their role, the program “focused on human tracking across a variety of terrains over long distances.” Each team “ran approximately 700 tracks” over the course of the program.

Brad Langham, one of the consultants who assisted in developing the new program, detailed how the new teams “should help deter cartel members bringing stuff across [the border], and it should be able to help with our security, help us feel a bit safer, and give our officers an extra capability to help stop that process.”

Texas Department of Public Safety director Steven McCraw celebrated the teams’ deployments, stating, “This is yet another step in increasing our efforts to secure our southern border…K-9 units have long played an integral role within DPS and we know these newly graduated teams will have a positive impact not only in the areas they serve, but really in keeping all Texans safe.”

K-9 units have an extensive track record of successfully inhibiting drug trafficking along the border. In the fiscal year 2021 alone, drug-sniffing dogs helped officers seize over $100 million worth of drugs being brought across the El Paso Sector of the border.

Still, the U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency has recently pushed for supplementing or replacing K-9 units with robotic dogs. Program manager Brenda Long explained the initiative by stating, “The southern border can be an inhospitable place for man and beast, and that is exactly why a machine may excel there.”

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Bobby
Bobby
1 month ago

we need machine gun towers every 50 yds and shoot the invaders in the Rio Grande. Survivors to be hung for terrorism / invasion

Max Bear
Max Bear
1 month ago

K-9’s worked so well in Nam, the gooks had a bounty on them. Why hasn’t the Army been asked to help? They have a K-9 training program and an abundance of dogs.

Lonestar
Lonestar
Reply to  Max Bear
1 month ago

The Posse Comitatus Act (most recently revised fiscal 2022) prevents the Army, Navy, Air Force, Space Force, and Marines from acting in such a domestic law-enforcement role. Exceptions to the Act are Army National Guard, Air National Guard, and Coast Guard.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Posse_Comitatus_Act

Lonestar
Lonestar
1 month ago

And for these six, there will be six distractions for them while drugs are transported over elsewhere over the border.

Sharee ZimmerleGarrison
Sharee ZimmerleGarrison
Reply to  Lonestar
1 month ago

They are trained to not pay attention to distractions I have been with people who own these dogs

Gail Turk
Gail Turk
1 month ago

I certainly hope these dogs are protected with armor in the wonderful job they will be doing.